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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 51 (some duplicates have been removed)
and the environment and touched on in the inaugural address and starting wednesday the president will hit the road, takes the message to residents of north carolina, georgia and north carolina. our next guest was a speechwriter for president clinton. including four state of the union addresses. michael waldman is executive director of the brennan center for justice at nyu. welcome. >> great to be with you. >> what's the strategy behind a more aggressive maybe antagonist kind of message that we might hear tomorrow night? >> well, one of the things is that it seems to be working. i think that his inaugural address, for example, was to me the best speech he's given as president. it didn't have some of the drabness and caution of some of his earlier speeches. it said something. and so, i think that if he keeps going with that approach of boldness and ambition it is not that everything he says is enacted in to law but he'll be able to make a case to the country and with some vivid colors and strong arguments. >> and the country wants to hear a lot about jobs which was relatively unmentioned in the inau
, in a political environment like congress? >> and, of course, as mark kelly has been pointing out. tucson wouldn't have happened in there were background checks. there's an economic message that the president is trying to convey. how difficult is this if he does not lay out the kind of specific alternative to the sequester that republicans are demanding in the house side? >> well, here's what's hard, ab drae. if he is going to talk about how we need to invest in infrastructure and education and all these other things, republicans will say wait, wait, wait. the problem we have is a spending problem. the deficit is running out of control. i would point you on pew that did some fascinating polling about people's priorities in january 2009 and january 2013. the fastest majority is reducing duj been fets. it will be interesting how much he focus on that behavior. snoo meanwhile, you are looking at live pictures of vatican city. the college of card mals will be convene says next month. could they picture first nonusual eastern to eat the national catholic church. you are watching the east room at the
that they are in a safe environment. >> i'm very concerned. because if it can happen to him, it can happen to anybody else. you know, if the person who took his life wasn't scared to do it, they could do it to anybody. >> reporter: this murder will be the focus of a special campus wide meeting tomorrow. in fact, the school has canceled classes for one hour so that all students, faculty, and staff can attend. at ume, derek valcourt, wjz eyewitness news. >> maryland state police say police were offering a $2,000 reward for information that helps lead to an arrest. >>> weerm, following a-- wjz, following a developing story. a johns hopkins doctor, under investigation by city police, is dead. denise has details in the newsroom for us. >> reporter: 54-year-old nikita levy's body was found at his home in towson. police tell us the former johns hopkins gynecologist was under investigation for secretly recording patients. according to police, earlier this month, levy was fired by hopkins, when another employee reported the allegations to hopkins security staff. in a stat
. it will need to be done in an environment where as we broaden the base, we both contribute to deficit reduction and hopefully are able to lower rates. on the business side, we have a contradiction in our fiscal tax system. our statutory rate is high. our effective rate is not as high. when you look at the united states against other countries, it the statutory rate makes the u.s. look unattractive compared to others. for individual firms, their average tax rate is much lower because of all of the complicated provisions that are part of the code now. it would be a challenge to take on those individual credit. there's no way way to bring the rate down. that is something i think we need to do to maintain competitiveness abroad. >> you still believe that going down the road we need to reduce that to get the rate down? >> i do. when one looks at a table of international tax rates, it stands up at u.s. statutory rate is high. it is a complicated story to tell that the average rate is lower. it does not affect all businesses equally. we need a simpler tax code. >> could you briefly comment on somethin
. ♪ chevron has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment.
for the environment schemes that they put in place. let me deal with each of those points. the section of the budget that includes spending on research, innovation and university funding is up by over a third. the money is handed out on the basis of quality, so britain's universities are particularly well placed to benefit. we have ensured that structural funds will continue to flow to our less well-off regions, and britain's share will remain broadly the same, at around 11 billion. while we have cut spending on the common agricultural policy overall, we have protected the flexibility that will allow us to direct funds to support both the environment and the livelihoods of our farming communities. overall, this is a better-framed budget in terms of growth, jobs and competitiveness. it is disappointing that administrative costs are still around 6% of the total, but overall spending on the cap will fall by 13% compared with the last seven-year budget. research and development, and other pro-growth investment, will now account for 13% rather than 9% of the total budget. reform of eu spending is a long-
make sure that we don't have on environment that crushes them. that is a number that is crushing our economy. >> it seems to me, you have to grow the pie larger than everybody. you can't say you have a smaller slice and you have a larger slice. the disagreement that i have with johnson, we do not believe that you grow the pie that you give corporations big tax breaks. >> that is pro growth. no, making sure that middle class people can get a job when they get out of college and we are losing all of those things and we can't afford to do it. >> senator ron johnson thank you, sir. and governor deal, thank you. howard you have more work to do in the program. now, let's talk markets. i want to know if investors are going to be paying attention to the state of the june union. how about the deal for comcast buying up the rest of nbc for $17 million. please stay with us for the state of the union here on c th nbc. [ male announcer ] how can power consumption in china, impact wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe
environment. here we go. thank you. here are some trends i see and how citizen as united plays into them. it did not cause them but it greases the wheels, especially since 2000 to when congress passed the bi-partisan campaign reform act. there is a redistribution of money away from can't attend toward groups. candidates are chiefly responsible but more is spent by others and for a while was political parties but it is non- party groups and citizens united cracked up this dynamic. there are strong incentives for collective action by partisans. national politics today is about high-stakes elections. both parties have a chance to control government and have very different views about what should be done. because of this, parses want to organize and coordinate but campaign finance laws but restraint of that. laws were designed during canada-centered elections and parties to an answer that much. we did it matter that much. we knew where the money was coming from. now we have super pacs and there is a severe mismatch between a high stakes system an old- fashioned laws that force money outside
constrained environment. these challenges combined with a destabilizing impact such terrorist and criminal networks on a general rodriquez's tosk at africom among the most complicated in the department. an additional matter in the africom aor the committee watches closely as the ongoing support of u.s. operations in central africa to assist the multinational effort to remove joseph coney and top lieutenants in the battlefield. this committee and general inhofe has been very active in this effort and has sought to ensure the mission is adequate resource including additional intelligence surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities. general rodriquez, i know that you are familiar with this mission and the committee looks forward to hearing from you about it and working with you on that and so many of the other challenges that you will be facing. i am going to turn the gavel over to senator kain has agreed to take over because i must close to the floor and i will call on senator inhofe. >> thank you mr. chair and i join you in welcoming the witnesses. i've had an opportunity to get to know th
with families, to life to changes in one's and environment, and to deal with adversity. just think about that. being productive, developing positive relationships with others, adapting to change, like adolescents, for example, dealing with adversity. we saw 30% rate of depression in new orleans after hurricane katrina. so mental health is being able to deal with these life challenges and circumstances and to be productive. it should follow then that mental disorder, mental illness represents alterations in those mental functions such that one is able to carry them out because the mood disorders, thinking disorders, were behavioral disorders. so mental disorders follow immediately from the definition of mental health. i do not want you to take your mental health for granted, because that is what we do. we take our known health for granted, and so therefore, we are not sympathetic when people have mental illnesses, because we have not thought about the fact we could lose it. we do not want to take our mental health for granted. there were five key messages in the surgeon general's report that c
to filibuster. dick durbin said at the time: cenk: positive environment, the republicans aren't going to filibuster anymore. they got a deal, so we didn't have to take it away. what happened today when senator hagel, a republican up for secretary of defense? the republicans filibustered. >> on this vote, the aye58 the nays 40, one senator announced present. 50% of the senators not having voted in the affirmative, the motion is not agreed to. cenk: even though 58 senators say yes let's end the debate and confirm him nope, not going to end the debate, because the republicans filibustering. now harry reid is shocked to find out that the republicans were not true to their word! >> the republicans have made an unfortunate choice to up the level here in washington. just when you thought things couldn't get worse, it gets worse. we need this vote today. why? times like this, it's nice to have a secretary of defense. cenk: man, harry reid, oh, you're killing 'em you're killing 'em take it easy, brother. this is the guy who gave it away earlier, allowing them to filibuster in the first place.
. it may allow people to detect light and dark in the environment. the blind can see something again. >> one of the things i can do now is laundry. my husband had to put the colored clothes all together in a pile. with the glasses, i'm able to do that myself. >> reporter: kathy blake is 61 and has been blind for 23 years. but after a two-hour surgery, kathy has a new perspective. >> the glasses really help me be more outdoors, with mobility, walking. >> reporter: right now, the device is only approved for retinitis p retinitis pigmentosa. complete vision loss. only about 100,000 people in the u.s. suffer from it. the device could be used to treat millions who can't see. >> i think that the future for this is going to be big. >> reporter: let's hope. and if you're wondering what sparked the doctor's interest in blindness? it turns out, his grandmother went blind. so, he devoted his entire career to finding a cure for this. >> how rewarding for him. >> thanks, gio. >>> coming up on the broadcast, the big question for "star wars" geeks. is harrison ford going to go solo one more time? k
knowledge, understanding the environment in which you are operating, communication and motivational skills, they are challenging, but they are in powering, rock-solid integrity, unusual determination, perseverance and perseverance. as you might guess, a great admirer of dr. rice, not quite as much as moamar ghadaffi. i don't have the scrapbook. [laughter] [applause] but i do have an enormous regard for dr. rice and i am jury pleased that she is here to do her formal introductions and i would like to invite the ambassador cobb to the stage. [applause] >> good morning everybody. thank you, president shalala, and my life for those nice comments. before i introduce condoleezza rice, i want to share with all of you if favoritism that i have, a bias that i have come and this is that i have a strong affinity for smart, strong, powerful, successful and charismatic leaders. as evidence of that -- [applause] as evidence of that, i have been married to one of those lease for 52 years. [applause] but a second evidence of that i had the pleasure to chair the search committee for the university of miami
.a. it is in orange county. it is a changing environment, but it is a wealthy, somewhat conservative community. one of the challenges i had was to make the library in a national institution while still respectful of local customs and that was not easy. >> so the foundation, the chairman is still ron walker. how would you describe -- you were very controversial you were about as controversial as any director. >> this is what -- i promised -- if you look at what i said from the beginning, from 2006 when the national archives hired me to do this, i was very straightforward about what i was going to do. so there is no debate in switching. the archives came to me. but it was a very interesting conflict of different events because the head of the nixon foundation at that point was john taylor, rev. john taylor. and john taylor is an intellectual. he is very complicated. he is a bit torn about nixon. and he admired nixon's mind. and he wanted nixon's library to be credible. now, i don't believe that every member of the nixon foundation shared john's intellectual goal. he really wanted the cold war histori
are not generally willing to pay for access to content. in a digital environment. they are interesting -- they are interested in supporting brands. i think they are interested and still willing to pay for experience. experiences are different than access. to be a little bit more precise about this, the old model used to be you give us $35 and we give you 20 issues of print. for a very long time, until the web and all the business models were disrupted. now, our model is you give us $35 and you get print but you also get our experiential products. it did -- the digital colom is all the things i was talking about before. unlimited access, commenting, several things in that list. you get access to subscriber- only events, which we are doing at least once a month in major cities and some secondary markets, ann arbor, austin, places where there are a lot of people interested in the type of journalism we do. whether or not that will be enough is an open question pri is certainly part of the trend where journalists are not just researching and writing. they are researching, writing, promoting
% of business owners that were surveyed identified the current environment as a bad time to expand and political uncertainty topped the list for the reasons not to attempt economic growth. lee, a resident of muskogee, oklahoma, and president of acme corporation, said a lot of small businesses had to go in debt to stay afloat. he said now they can't make the money they need to to pay down debts due in large part the environment the government has created. i joined a small group of members in congress. i have faced unprecedented difficulties ensuring my business succeeded. i step on the floor of the united states house of representatives with a firsthand understanding how high the hurdles are for a business to succeed and just simply jump over. last month when president obama was sworn into his second term, i was reminded of something he said four years ago in his first inauguration. the president said, "the question we ask today is not whether our government is too big or too small but whether it works, whether it helps families finds a job at a decent wage, care they can afford or retirement tha
, immigration, the environment, everything basically, but his lead on foreign policy is a staggering 14 points. what makes republicans think this is a good thing to have a fight over? >> right. up until recently everybody said, look, politics stops at the water's edge, and that hasn't been the case for the last couple years with this republican party. but it turns out that it wasn't necessarily that both parties followed that axiom because they were being nice about it. it turns out that it's incredibly bad politics to challenge your sitting president overseas. and, you know, this benghazi thing has not worked out for the republican party at all. they tried effectively to make it the biggest issue of the presidential campaign in the last several weeks, and people just didn't buy into it. what they saw is a tragedy. something that was -- if it could have been prevented, it should have been prevented, but they weren't going to start pointing blame and ask for the resignations of hillary clinton and throw barack obama out of office. >> right. >> and the idea that you'd be able to stop future cia
of with those benefits that we're not able to have right now. i hope that casey grows up in an environment where they'll look back at this and say wow, you know, this is crazy that they had to go through that. but i hope that sees that her parents are proud enough to step up and fight for her equality as well. >> around thanksgiving, charlie morgan told the "washington post" that she was praying that the supreme court would hear the challenge to doma quickly. she said, quote, i really need to be alive when they actually do overturn doma. otherwise karen is not guaranteed anything. charlie morgan did not make it that far. she died on sunday morning. she was 48 years old. the "washington post" reports that her widow karen will not receive survivor benefits. the paper also notes that in ordinary times, charlie and karen would have been glad for the new executive order allowing the family to shop on military bases. we asked today whether officer charlie morgan had heard about the changes that secretary panetta was preparing to announce today. the answer is that it appears she had not. she apparently
, the environment would be destroyed, the world would come to an end by us building that pipeline. you know, we're multiple decades past. it's worked very well. there haven't been those disasters that people claimed. but on top of that, i know my friend from louisiana mentioned the environmental impact, and, you know, that it makes sense, the pipeline is the safest way to move oil but on top of that, you have a choice and the senator from north dakota made it very clear, that is you get the -- to refine it in china or the u.s. i don't know about anybody here but i would bet we all agree between the environmental standards, we have a better environmental record than china does in refinery and refining of oil products. so it makes sense for us to do it here. on top of that, i know and, again, from alaska which people travel there not just for the jobs and opportunity but the beauty of alaska. we have more visitors who want to see the pipeline, to visit the pipeline. when i went down on a rafting trip you're in nowhere land. unbelievable beauty but one of the last things you see when you come down
learning environment every single day. you know? michelle and i remember how tough it can be to find good and how expensive it can be too. the size of your paycheck, though, shouldn't determine your child's future. so let's fix this. let's make sure none of our kids start out the race of life already a step behind. let's make it a national priority to give every child access to a high quality early education. let's give our kids that chance. now, i do have to warn the parents who are here that still have young kids, they grow up to be like 5'10" and even if they're still nice to you, they basically don't have a lot of time for you on the weekends. they have sleepovers and dates. so thaul early investment just leads them to go away. now, what i also said on tuesday night is that our commitment to our kids' education has to continue throughout their academic lives. from the time our kids start grade school, we need to equip them with the skills they need to compete in a high-tech economy. that's why we're working to recruit and train 100,000 new teachers in the fields of the future, in scie
. in this environment right now, how does this change? what should the president do? >> well, i think he's laid a proposal out there. i think it's a good proposal. i think in the end what'll probably happen is he'll get it through if he sticks to it and he'll negotiate. it might not be $9 an hour, but maybe it's 8.25ds an hour. look, if you're right there on the brink of making $7.25 an hour, a dollar an hour more might mean something to you. look, in new orlealouisiana, in where i live right now, they have a 9.5% sales tax. they're talking about raising it to 14% maybe. can you imagine what that does to a minimum wage worker down here? it just slaughters people. thank god we've got people that are willing to stand up and point out what's going on here, how you can help these people without having any effect on employment. i don't know why we haven't done this a long time ago to tell you the truth. >> let's talk about congress for a moment. today we saw officially just an unprecedented filibuster of defense secretary nominee chuck hagel. is this the worst you've ever seen in congress? >> well,
they are supportive of them controlled than they were back in december of 1993. even the environment looks different. even more important than that, it is really that moderate seat held by democrats do not belong to democrats any more. do belong to very conservative republicans. seats that were held by moderate republicans are now held by democrats. that makes the democrats all that much -- that makes the dynamic all that more problematic. if you are a gun owner that it's a certain democratic profile, that makes it more likely that you are actually eight republicans. host: host: you wrote about this. ece. is amy's pi guest: we still have to do it immigration reform. host: biscuit the viewer is involved -- let's get the viewers involved. caller: we should be able to vote on our own gun control and immigration policies. host: what do you mean by that? caller: you can vote whether you want immigration control, yes or no. enforce our laws we already have. the american people can vote. the details can be worked out by congress. host: do you think the electorate moves forward on these issues by voting for
in a much more urban environment or maybe it's fortunate. it is a very urban and compact environment. moving a lot of snow piles are going to require heavier equipment. >> reporter: governor asking all nonessential employees to stay home. a lot of businesses closed today, jon. the streets as i mentioned are relatively quiet. that is good thing as they try to clear the snow. jon: it is a heavy snow too. it is a lot of moisture in there. it is hard to dig out. >> reporter: but good for snowballs. jon: always finding a bright spot. rick leventhal in ham den, connecticut. jenna: a fox news alert for you boeing out to california where police are offering a one million dollar reward for information leading to the capture of christopher dorner, a name you are now familiar with. this is the former cop accused of killing three people and sparking a multi-state manhunt. william la jeunesse is live at l.a.p.d. headquarters with more on this story. william, police have up the ante. >> reporter: having declared war on the l.a.p.d. the department responded in kind this weekend, labeling him a domestic ter
of 43% trust republicans with gun policy. on the issue of the environment, 55% trust president obama more. foreign policy, it is 51% to 37%. theresa, nevada. caller: regarding president obama using executive orders to go around the republicans in the house, i am all for it. i am aware that this is a two- party democracy and we need republicans to be reasonable working party, but they have not been. the president has no choice but to go around them. john boehner has walked away. i am frustrated and the country is frustrated, other democrats are frustrated and scared. i am scared of the things they're willing to do to our country. he is doing what he has to do. i am all for his proposals, all for clean energy and comprehensive immigration, i am for gun legislation. i am for all of them. i am center-left, that is progressive. i think the country is definitely going progressive. i do not understand where the republicans want to obstruct and go with their small mindedness and small government proposals that they think that they can push through on the american people that i do not think a
recognizes the lucky environment and knows what to do with it. so, yeah, i'd agree with you completely. >> we're going to have to close this off. thank you. do you have any comments about petraeus coming pack to public life? >> he's not going to come back to public life, i mean, in the sense of political life? i think that in a few months you'll see him reemerging. you know, he's being advised, his career counselor the same guy who advised president clinton after his own little scrape -- [laughter] and he advises a lot of people. and he's very good at it. so i think you haven't seen the last of him, let's put it that way. >> thank you so much. >> thank you, thank you. [applause] >> watch it here on c-span2. >> good morning. stacy schiff was a wonderful biographer of, among others, cleopatra recently observed that biographers all have two lives. okay in back? can you hear? all right, good. in one realm, she says, the biographers are moving forward in ignorance. in the other you're moving backward with something resembling omniscience. now, what she doesn't say is that along with the illusion o
on the environment. belief in science. and this right wing crowd doesn't want to buy into any of this. >> bill: you know what really offends me tonight so there will be parents of the kids who were shot down and killed in newtown, connecticut right. then you're going to have ted nugent who called them props. parents in chicago who have lost their kids. another city. calls them all props. >> a number of people every day that die from gun violence. >> bill: it is just sick for the republicans to allow him to come in. so what are you looking forward to tonight? what are you expecting? >> i was going to talk about the issues you just mentioned. to me, it is always about jobs and the economy. we're still -- we lost -- you've heard me say this far too many times. we lost five million manufacturing jobs from 2000 until 2010. we've gained about 500,000 of them back. that's really the ticket for so many americans the middle class. it is not the only answer. when we see wages decline and we see so many people able to keep up in life, manufacturing jobs, you know, higher tech manufacturing jobs, jobs that sor
is managing director of resources and environment at the gao. cathleen berrick is managing director of homeland security and justice issues that the gao. philip herr of infrastructure issues at the gao. orice williams brown is managing director of financial markets, an area particular concerns in committee investment at the gao. and mr. david powner is managing systems at the gao. i'm now going to ask about to stand because if you're going to help the general come you may very well be a witness. would you please raise your right hand and pursuant to the committee roasts, please raise your right hands. do you solemnly swear or affirm the testimony about to give up the truth, whole truth and nothing but the truth? let the record reflect the witnesses answered in the affirmative. normally we have the five-minute clock. for your reference will have it. if you've an overcoming of the whole show today. sachin come you recognize. >> thank you, mr. chairman. wing commander cummings, members of the committee, i'm pleased to be invited today to talk about the high-risk list the day. we do the
able to find the technology to help clean up all of the environment. all over the world. and i was very disappointed. >> senator? >> we're going to work hard. >> senator, it sounds like you're expecting that the executive order as the president promised are not going to be to your liking. what do you expect him to do? what do you expect the epa to do over the next few months? >> i'm very much concerned on expanding executive orders from the standpoint -- i think we should practice what our founding fathers set up in motion and go through this process that we're prepared to do both in the senate and house side. here we are as bipartisan, lynn and myself, no labels, speaking of problem-solvers, we can sit down and work this out and come to an agreement. and we're hopeful the leadership will allow us to do that. >> some of these manufacturing hubs, congresswoman, i wonder if you think those will really bear any fruit. there was a point where youngstown was trending on twitter. the president joked about elected officials going to some of these ribbon-cuttings. but is there anything to that
in syria is it makes the operational environment much easier for al-qaeda and its allies. they can operate in cairo. they can have public demonstrations in cairo with mubarak gone and it doesn't hurt them. they don't get arrested or chased out of the country. so the changing middle east has played to the strengths of al-qaeda and certainly in terms of the pressure on them, except for pakistan, the pressure is off. >> brian: when you mentioned on the radio show to me that you're worried about your grandchildren and the world in which we are right now, we're cutting back and almost saying the enemy doesn't exist. >> well, it's not almost, brian. people like john brennan and the president, who have gone out of their way to say that jihad is like a rotary club for the world. they're just self-improving muslims. they've gone out of the way to make americans believe the danger and the threat in the world is reduced. and the combination of that lie with the cuts in the defense budget are certainly not good news for american security. >> brian: john brennan, we just saw video of him. he's poised t
in this environment. we had to raise them because of the acuity of an economic crisis. we now have an operating balance budget for the first time in a decade. california's beginning to click back. do not count us out. >> right. you know, though, gavin, though, you have always been straightforward and i've always respected you a great deal. you're a progressive politician, but you understand what it takes to bring small businesses to california. you've been concerned about high tax rates in california for a long time. >> yeah. >> and you're exactly right. whether it's rick perry who we've made a lot of fun of over the past year. you talk about rick scott. they are obsessed with bringing jobs back to their states. and it worked. what does california do? what does new york do? what does connecticut do? what do these states do that have this high tax burden and also have a lot of debt to pay off? how do they balance that with staying competitive for the next decade? >> well, the most important thing these states do is what california and new york, to degree have done, and that's deal with solvency.
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 51 (some duplicates have been removed)

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